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Load image into Gallery viewer, Gilmour 801014-1001 End Female Clamp Coupling
Load image into Gallery viewer, Gilmour 801014-1001 End Female Clamp Coupling
  • Load image into Gallery viewer, Gilmour 801014-1001 End Female Clamp Coupling
  • Load image into Gallery viewer, Gilmour 801014-1001 End Female Clamp Coupling
Vendor
Gilmour

Gilmour 801014-1001 End Female Clamp Coupling

4.4
Regular price
AU$ 63.00
Sale price
AU$ 63.00
Regular price
AU$ 104.00
Sold out
Unit price
per 
Save 39% (AU$ 41.00)
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  • Tracked Shipping on All Orders
  • 14 Days Returns

Description

  • For 5/8 inch or 3/4 inch hoses
  • For the end of the hose that connects to your faucet
  • Impact-resistant clamp and stainless steel screws
  • Durable, reusable and easy to install
  • High grade stainless steel screws

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  • All customers are entitled to a return window of 14 days, starting from the date of delivery of the product(s).
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Customer Reviews

Works great, but don't make the same mistakes I made Works great. I wish it were manufactured in the USA and not China. Don't make the same mistakes I made, namely do NOT separate the two brass parts and then drive the part that fits into the hose home, trapping the brass collar below it on the hose! I'm embarrassed to admit that I did this *twice*. A hacksaw works well for cutting the hose, btw. Harder to cut yourself with a hacksaw versus a utility knife. I found that soaking the cut end of the hose in hot water for a minute helps, as does using, say, the handle end of a pair of pliers to stretch open the hose just a bit so you can insert the brass nozzle end, and remember you need the brass collar in place before you insert the nozzle end. I unscrewed both of the screws holding the clamp together and then placed both halves on the hose once the brass parts were situated. Tighten the screws and voila! Hose is repaired, zero leaks. Neat little product, and thank Heaven there are no hose clamps involved in this solution. Looks good, works good. Just don't *improvise* and save yourself a headache or two! Much cheaper than buying a new hose. But again I do wish it had been manufactured in the USA and not China. 5Change the screws The provided slot head machine screws were not long enough for my 3/4" hose. I took a suggestion from the Q&A to buy 8-32 x 3/4" machine screws but the slotted drive did not supply the torque needed to tighten. Finally, I ordered some 8-32 x 3'4" socket head cap screws so I could apply more torque. The leaks are sealed. In my opinion if the coupling is advertised to fit a 3/4" hose as this one was, it should fit and work without a redesign by the user. 3No more leaks! I used a hacksaw to cut the end of the hose off. I had read other reviews about soaking the hose in hot water to make it easier to get the new connector into the end of the hose, so I did that. I then used the old piece I had cut off to help push it in by pushing it against the ground. It was quick and easy and then all that was left to do was screw the new clamp down. I do have some space left in between the clamp, but it still works great and doesn t leak a single drop! 5Upgrade to Lazy I have used the plastic hose couplings for years. Some have actually lasted a few seasons. The screw threads strip out, or the ends just break. Even with the improved brass grommet lug they still met a premature demise. The first ones I bought were under a dollar, and have watched the price double and triple over the years, yet reluctant in going for the more expensive brass/zinc couplings, which I assumed would outlive the hose itself.Well, either the hoses were more resilient than I projected or the plastic couplings were just too temporary. I replaced all the hose ends I could with these Zinc couplings, and other than a little tarnished, their function is flawless after the first year. I have had to snug them down due to the different weather temperatures with the expansion and contractions of the hose, and they tightened securely. The Brass hose thread has not depreciated from wear and still provides a dripless fit.I think of all the time and effort I could have saved in utilizing these couplings from day one. Perhaps time creates true wisdom, but Lazy can be an intelligent shortcut....... sometimes. 5Tip for 3/4" Hose Here s a tip for those of you who want to put these fittings on 3/4" hoses that have thick walls. Also for those of you who are replacing those no kink hoses with aluminum fittings with these brass fittings (and if you re not, you should be - those aluminum ends will PERMANENTLY bond to any brass water device you attach). Anyway, the way to successfully attach these brass/clamps to a 3/4" hose: Go down to HD or Lowe s and buy some 8-32 x 3/4" round head, stainless steel, machine screws. The screws provided with these clamps are 8-32 x 5/8" and they work fine for 5/8" hose. But they are a little short for 3/4" hose (they reach the threads but do not give enough bite to get a really good grip on the female threads); the 3/4" screws will reach deep into the female so you can really torque them down on the hose. 1)Make a nice square cut on the end of the hose 2)Insert the brass fitting 3)Place the clamp pieces around the hose close enough to the end to ensure they surround the brass fitting inside 4)I used a pair of channel locks to squeeze the clamps together so the 3/4" screws will get started into the threads 5)Spin the screws down until the clamps are beginning to grip the hose; keep the clamps equally spaced on each side 6)Because they fit Phillips slots much better than standard screwdriver, I use JIS (Japanese) tip screwdrivers to gradually tighten the screws equally and draw the clamps together. 7)Just keep drawing the clamps together; the extra length of the 3/4" screws will have enough bite into the female thread to allow you to really tighten them. After the screws seem to have reached their limit of tight , let the hose rest for 30 minutes or so - then see if you can draw them up a little tighter some more. I ve put 3 sets on this way and have not (yet) stripped out the female threads. When you feel you have reached the tight , test it for water leaks; if you have any, you can probably draw them up a little more - keep going and the leak will stop. By the way, the Gilmour brand is the most substantial I have seen yet. I will post this on both the male and female fittings. 5Finally, no leaks or unwanted showers! I replaced a leaky plastic connector with this Gilmour connector and it hasn't leaked a drop since. Installation requires care and patience as mating the barbed connector into the existing hose is not easy. It's an extremely tight fit as it should be to secure it into the hose and prevent leakage. Upon your initial inspection you may think there is no way you're going to be able to insert it into the hose but it will fit. I used a utility knife to cut a slight bevel on the hose ID (inner diameter), softened the hose with very hot water that I heated in my microwave thereby making it a little more flexible), and placed a small amount of liquid dish soap on the inside of the hose where the barb connector slides into. Once I was able to to force a small section of the barbed male connector into the hose, I placed a small piece of wood (I used a small piece of a 2" x 4") on the end of it and tapped the wood with a hammer to slide (force) the barbed connector into the hose the rest of the way. It was a bit of a chore but in the summer I use this garden hose almost every day and it hasn't leaked a drop. One more suggestion: on the threaded male end of the hose that you screw into (connect) to the Gilmour connector, I wrapped three turns of plumber's tape (Teflon tape) around the male end of the hose. I think this also helps to insure a leak-proof connection. I hope these tips help you during your installation. 5Worked perfectly I installed it and it worked perfectly - that is, it did not leak. It took a little muscle to push my hose onto the coupling, so I completely unscrewed the back part and removed it, then screwed the coupling onto my outside faucet. I pushed my hose onto this fitting up as far as I could push, holding onto my house faucet for stability. It probably would have been easier to push it on if I had put some lubrication on the inside of the hose first, maybe even some water. While still attached to my outside faucet, I installed the back piece, about a 1/4" back from the head, with its screws. It's not necessary to over tighten. Yes, I'm more comfortable with a metal coupling than a plastic one; especially since this piece will be in the direct sun. 5Easy install. The brass material appears to be on good quality. Time will tell. I replaced both ends on my 5/8" garden hose. Easy install. Make an even cut on the hose. Slide the clamp on to the hose after loosening the screws a bit. Warm up and/or use soap on the hose and brass fitting for easier installation. For 5/8" hose, push down onto the fitting onto to a wood surface by grabbing the hose. Rock side to a bit to work it onto the brass fitting barb. For the female fitting screw on a Male end for better control. Slide the clamp almost all the way to the brass end. Tighten the screws 4 turns each, alternating for an even clamp. You will have an gap between the clamps after tightening the screws. Gap varies wirh hose wall thickness. Mine was 1/8". 5Sturdy and effective. Well made product. Fixed a plastic fitting that came with a hose that had been attached to one spigot for years. When I moved it to another spigot, I found that no matter how tightly I attached it, both with and without a washer, if I shut off the water at the far end of the hose, the back pressure would blow the hose off the spigot due to the threads not holding strongly enough.Cutting off the bad plastic fitting was relatively easy. But it can take a bit of doing to get the barb for this started into the cut hose end and a lot of force and work to get it slide completely into the hose. Using a bit of soapy water might help, and it should be done when the hose end is warm. Could even warm it up in hot water or with a hair drier, etc. to make it a bit more pliable.Was able to get the barb fully seated and tightened down the clamp, which is plenty heavy duty and has little tabs to dig into the hose and hold it in place as well as clamp it to the barb.The connection to the spigot leaked at first, but adding a washer and getting it nice and snug took care of the problem.Works well for the purpose and is sturdy enough to last a long time. 4No chance of getting this coupling into a 5/8 hose. There is no way this coupling will fit into a 5/8 dia hose by the wildest stretch of your imagination. It is an exercise in futility unless you own a 1 ton press. To begin, the assembly of the screwed together parts must have been accomplished by Oddjob (from the James Bond novels). I used boiling hot water to soften the hose end after cutting off the old coupling. Slid on the threaded end that attaches to the hose bib and for better than 15 minutes worked the barbed end into the hose. I might mention here that the barbed end is not tapered as expected to facilitate entry into the hose. One photo shows the tools amassed for this daunting task. Another photo shows the extent of entry into the hose end that was managed. If that wasn't bad enough, trying to slide the threaded end previously installed over the hose is impossible. After 30 minutes I said enough and cut off the offending coupling. Tomorrow its off to the hardware store and pick up the correct sized mending coupling. Have a nice day. 2
Gilmour 801014-1001 End Female Clamp Coupling

Gilmour 801014-1001 End Female Clamp Coupling

4.4
Error You can't add more than 500 quantity.
Regular price
AU$ 63.00
Sale price
AU$ 63.00
Regular price
AU$ 104.00
Sold out
Unit price
per 
Save 39% (AU$ 41.00)